Final Fantasy XIV – A Small Critique

Final Fantasy XIV is my favorite modern MMORPG. I’m reluctant to say favorite MMORPG, because I grew up playing Dark Age of Camelot and EverQuest, so both of those games will hold an extra special place in my heart. There’s a lot to love about FF14, namely its gorgeous graphics, unique multi classing system, adorable emotes, countless glamors, and excellent late game boss mechanics. It also has the best player housing system I’ve seen in an MMORPG, but I haven’t seen the new homesteads in Elder Scrolls Online, which I heard was great. The one thing that nags me about FF14 though is that each job has zero actual customization. This means that every single Black Mage has access to the exact same set of skills. In fact, there’s ZERO difference between every max level black mage in the game. That’s right; zero class customization. Most people don’t criticize this feature because the class system overall is pretty great, as everyone can play EVERY class on a single character. Switching between classes only requires a player to equip a new weapon. Tired of being a mage? Just equip a bow and now you’re an archer! Being able to play every class on one character is great, but it doesn’t excuse the lack of customization on a per class basis. Yes, there are stat points, but there’s only ever 1 viable stat point build per class.

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Oddball MMOs

With the hundreds of MMOs out there including mainstream titles like The Elder Scrolls Online and World of Warcraft there are quite a few oddball games out there too. Games most people probably never heard of. One such title is Areeb World from Remal IT, a Middle Eastern technology conglomerate. Most of MMORPGs nowadays are developed in South Korea or China with a few titles hailing from Japan, but Areeb World is from Saudi Arabia. I personally haven’t played Areeb World yet and probably never will because of its business model. The game is buy to play and costs a cool $54.99 on Steam. I don’t know about you, but I’m not ready to shell out $54.99 for an oddball game that looks like a mix between Spirit Tales and Dragon Oath, which for those that don’t know are two really old sub-par games. The explosive growth of free to play MMOs has reshaped the entire industry. Nowadays, only the premium franchises (think Final Fantasy XIV and The Elder Scrolls Online) can get away with charging money these days. Continue reading